NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
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Johannes Rausch

Munich Center for the Economics of Aging
Max Planck Institute
for Social Law and Social Policy
Amalienstraße 33, 80799 Munich, Germany

E-Mail: EmailAddress: hidden: you can email any NBER-related person as first underscore last at nber dot org
Institutional Affiliation: Max Planck Institute

NBER Working Papers and Publications

July 2020Social Security Reforms and the Changing Retirement Behavior in Germany
with Axel H. Börsch-Supan, Nicolas Goll: w27518
As much like other industrialized countries, in recent decades the employment rate in Germany for those aged 55 to 69 had been declining first to considerably rise again afterwards. This paper investigates the role of structural policy changes, in particular reforms of the pension system, since 1980 in explaining this trend reversal. We summarize the institutional changes and pension reforms that may account for the trend reversal, and calculate an “implicit tax on working longer”. We find that for both men and women the increase in the employment rate coincides with a reduction in the early retirement incentive. The reduction of incentives mainly stems from the introduction of actuarial deductions for early retirement and from the abolishment of specific early retirement pathways.
December 2019Social Security Reforms and the Changing Retirement Behavior in Germany
with Axel Börsch-Supan, Nicolas Goll
in Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Reforms and Retirement Incentives, Axel Börsch-Supan and Courtney Coile, editors
April 2014Health, Financial Incentives, and Early Retirement: Microsimulation Evidence for Germany
with Hendrik Jürges, Lars Thiel, Tabea Bucher-Koenen, Morten Schuth, Axel Börsch-Supan
in Social Security Programs and Retirement Around the World: Disability Insurance Programs and Retirement, David A. Wise, editor
About 20% of German workers retire on disability pensions. Disability pensions provide fairly generous benefits for those who are not already age-eligible for an old-age pension and who are deemed unable to work for health reasons. In this paper, we use two sets of individual survey data to study the role of health and financial incentives in early retirement decisions in Germany, in particular disability benefit uptake. We show that financial incentives to retire do affect sick individuals at least as much as healthy individuals. Based on 25 years of individual survey data and empirical models of retirement behavior, we then simulate changes in the generosity of disability pensions to understand how these changes would affect retirement behavior. Our results show that making the disabilit...
February 2014Health, Financial Incentives, and Early Retirement: Micro-Simulation Evidence for Germany
with Hendrik Juerges, Lars Thiel, Tabea Bucher-Koenen, Morten Schuth, Axel Boersch-Supan: w19889
About 20% of German workers retire on disability pensions. Disability pensions provide fairly generous benefits for those who are not already age-eligible for an old-age pension and who are deemed unable to work for health reasons. In this paper, we use two sets of individual survey data to study the role of health and financial incentives in early retirement decisions in Germany, in particular disability benefit uptake. We show that financial incentives to retire do affect sick individuals at least as much as healthy individuals. Based on 25 years of individual survey data and empirical models of retirement behavior, we then simulate changes in the generosity of disability pensions to understand how these changes would affect retirement behavior. Our results show that making the disabilit...
 
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