NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH
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Lukas Schmid

Marshall School of Business
University of Southern California

E-Mail: EmailAddress: hidden: you can email any NBER-related person as first underscore last at nber dot org
Institutional Affiliations: University of Southern California and CEPR

NBER Working Papers and Publications

May 2020A No-Arbitrage Perspective on Global Arbitrage Opportunities
with Patrick Augustin, Mikhail Chernov, Dongho Song: w27231
We revisit the recent literature on persistent deviations from covered interest parity (CIP) by showing theoretically that CIP violations imply arbitrage opportunities only if uncollateralized interbank lending rates are riskless. In the absence of observable riskless discount rates, we extract them empirically using a simple no-arbitrage framework. They deliver novel quantitative benchmarks for foreign exchange contracts that match observed forward currency premiums and cross-currency basis swap rates well. The no-arbitrage benchmarks account for about two thirds of the alleged CIP deviations, while the residual pricing errors line up with measures of intermediary constraints and the expensiveness of the U.S. dollar.
November 2019Benchmark Interest Rates When the Government is Risky
with Patrick Augustin, Mikhail Chernov, Dongho Song: w26429
Since the Global Financial Crisis, rates on interest rate swaps have fallen below maturity matched U.S. Treasury rates across different maturities. Swap rates represent future uncollateralized borrowing between banks. Treasuries should be expensive and produce yields that are lower than those of maturity matched swap rates, as they are deemed to have superior liquidity and to be safe, so this is a surprising development. We show, by no-arbitrage, that the U.S. sovereign default risk explains the negative swap spreads over Treasuries. This view is supported by a quantitative equilibrium model that jointly accounts for macroeconomic fundamentals and the term structures of interest and U.S. credit default swap rates. We account for interbank credit risk, liquidity effects, and cost of collate...
 
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